Conference Proposal Guidelines

Overview

This support article outlines the different options available to you as you submit your conference proposal.

1. Presentation Type

Paper Presentation: This type of session is best suited for reports on completed research or scholarly work. Authors present summaries or overviews of their work, describing the essential features (related to purpose, procedures, outcomes or product). The formal oral presentation of work should be limited to 20 minutes. Presentations are grouped according to topic or perspective into these themed sessions (which are usually either 75 or 100 minutes), with time provided after all of the presentations for Q&A and group discussion. Authors are welcome to include visual supports (paper handouts, computer slides, or digital displays) to assist delivery of their oral presentation. Please note that we cannot provide photocopying facilities at the conference, but we will provide data projectors in each room. Multiple-authored presentations are welcome, although only one article may be submitted to the journal based on each presentation.

Poster: This format is ideal for presenting preliminary results of work in progress or for projects that lend themselves to visual displays and representations. In these sessions (generally about 45 minutes), a number of authors have the opportunity to display or exhibit their work and engage in informal discussion about their work with other delegates throughout the session. Displays may be posters (maximum 121.92x91.44 centimeters/4x3 feet), digital/computer displays, artwork, or other visual media. Each display should include a brief abstract of the purpose and procedures of the work; handouts or copies of written material may also be available. Space for the poster or exhibit will be provided by the Conference, however all materials must be organized by the presenter, including posters, displays, handouts or other appropriate materials. Please note that we cannot guarantee a dedicated power source for each presenter. Authors may submit a formal paper describing their work to the journal associated with their proposal.

Colloquia: This Conference Session is scheduled for 90 minutes and involves five authors who are proposing a set of papers based on a shared theme or topic. The papers may present complementary aspects of a specific body of work, or contrasting perspectives on a specified topic. There must be at least five registered participants (for example, a Chair and four presenters, or five presenters). The presenters should conceive and design the session to allow time for individual presentations (approximately 15 minutes each) and at least 15 minutes of audience discussion or question-and-answer. All participants must be listed on the proposal submission form (list as one primary author, and 4 or more co-authors). Either a single article or multiple articles may be submitted to the journal based on the content of a colloquium session.

Focused Discussion: This type of session is best suited for position papers, reviews of theoretical or conceptual frameworks, works-in-progress, policy analysis, or topics that generate, or benefit from, extended discussion. Authors are each assigned a numbered table in a large meeting room for the full session (usually about 40 minutes), during which time they converse and interact with interested delegates who join them at their table. The discussion may begin with the author presenting a synopsis of their work, to generate discussion on the topic. Authors are encouraged to bring copies of their papers and/or a short handout summarizing their work for distribution at their tables. Multiple authors of a single paper may participate, and one article per roundtable may be submitted for publication.

Workshop Sessions: Workshop sessions involve extensive interaction between presenters and participants around an idea or hands-on experience of a practice. These sessions may also take the form of a crafted panel, staged conversation, dialogue or debate – all involving substantial interaction with the audience. A single article (jointly authored, if appropriate) may be submitted to the journal based on a workshop session.

Virtual Poster: This format is ideal for presenting preliminary results of work in progress or for projects that lend themselves to visual displays and representations. Each poster should include a brief abstract of the purpose and procedures of the work. After acceptance, presenters are provided with a template, and Virtual Posters are submitted as a PDF or in PowerPoint. Final posters must be submitted at least one month prior to the conference start date. Full papers can based in the virtual poster can also be submitted for consideration in the journal.

Virtual Lightning Talk: Lightning talks are 5-minute "flash" video presentations. Authors present summaries or overviews of their work, describing the essential features (related to purpose, procedures, outcomes, or product). Like Paper Presentations, Lightning Talks are grouped according to topic or perspective into themed sessions. Authors are welcome to submit traditional "lecture style" videos or videos that use visual supports like PowerPoint. Final videos must be submitted at least one month prior to the conference start date. After the conference, videos are then presented on the Research Network YouTube channel. Full papers can based in the virtual poster can also be submitted for consideration in the journal.

Innovation Showcase (Available for select conferences only): Researchers and innovators present products or research and development. All presentations should be grounded in presenters' research experience. Promotional conversations are permissible, however, products or services may not be sold at the conference venue. Authors may submit a formal article describing their research to The Organization Collection.


2. Short Description

A short summary of the main idea of your proposal. This will appear in the Conference Program and will provide the information other delegates use to choose your session to attend. Absolute limit of 30 words.


3. Longer Description

A concise description of the purpose, methods, and implications of your scholarly work. This will be used to evaluate and place your work in the appropriate session. Include all required components as outlined in the Proposal Guidelines. If your paper is subsequently published as an article in the journal, this will serve as the Abstract (you may revise this abstract prior to publication). Recommended length 150-200 words.


4. Keyword Set

Keywords are used to organize presentations into appropriate sessions, so please choose words that clearly describe the main idea of your work.


5. Knowledge Focus

Choose if your work has a Practice, Research, or Theory focus. Note the required components of the proposal for each Focus area:

Research Focus

  • Thesis statement: the hypothesis, research statement, statement of the problem or issue being explored.
  • Methodology: A brief overview of research method used to address the research question identified in the thesis statement. For the proposal, include information on the type of data collected (e.g., surveys, interviews, tests, literary analysis or critique, observations) but not on design, sampling, or data analysis techniques (these should be explained in the full paper).
  • Results: the main findings of the study, resulting from the methods used.
  • Conclusions and Implications: what the results mean for the field of study or for society; relate back to the thesis statement.

Practice Focus

  • Framework: the scholarly knowledge base--theoretical framework, previous research, or conceptual approach--upon which the practical application is based.
  • Description of practical application: what was designed or developed, how was it implemented, in what setting and with whom?
  • Outcomes: what has been learned from the implementation, what strengths and weaknesses have been identified?
  • Implications: what are the next steps or the implications for future practice or for society.

Theory Focus

  • Statement of the hypothesis, theoretical perspective, or philosophical idea being asserted.
  • Relationship to existing theories or perspectives in the field.
  • Contribution: how proposed idea advances knowledge in the field or benefits society.

6. Theme Selection

Select a theme that best categorizes your work. Theme selections will be used to begin the process of organizing presentations into sessions. Theme selection will also determine the journal into which we publish your article, should you choose to submit and article for review and possible publication in the journal.


7. Biographical Information

Organization or institution, position or title within the organization/institution, short statement of interests.


8. Language

Proposals and presentations must be in English. For information about conference and publishing proposals in Spanish, visit our Spanish language website.


You may download a PDF of these guidelines by pressing the button below:

Proposal Guidelines